The Chemical Cocktail of Skin Care

Remember the scene in Goldfinger when the Bond girl is covered in gold paint and dies because her skin suffocates? While it is doubtful whether anyone would regularly practise anything so obviously wacky (not to mention expensive!) the outcome itself is not as crazy as it sounds. We tend to forget that the skin is the largest organ of the body,and every day we apply a chemical cocktail of substances in ignorant bliss, unaware that up to 60% of anything applied topically can be absorbed into our bodies. As the average woman uses up to 14 different skincare and cosmetic products each day, this calculates to a massive two kilograms of different chemicals each year seeping into our systems. So why does this matter? With many of the synthetic ingredients used in everyday skin care being potentially toxic to humans, you may like to reconsider some of the following:

Petrochemical derived ingredients (such as mineral oil) are extensively used in skin care as they help prevent water loss. While this may seem beneficial, they actually prevent the skin from breathing by forming an occlusive barrier, disrupting the skins normal functioning.

Parabens (a common preservative) have demonstrated oestrogen mimicking activity which disrupts the body’s normal hormonal balance. In addition, parabens have also been shown to cause abnormalities in cell reproduction, an issue also associated with cancerous cells.

Sodium Laurel Sulphate (SLS) (a foaming agent) used in toothpaste, shampoo and foaming cleansers. Numerous trials showed that SLS can increase transdermal water loss causing the skin to become dehydrated and cause skin irritation.

Phthalates are a group of synthetic chemicals that are used in the production of various substances such as plastics, beauty products and artificial fragrances. Phthalates can interfere with reproductive tissues in both men and women leading to issues such as infertility and birth defects. Specifically it targets the testes in men and breast tissue in women.

Parfum and synthetic fragrances are the most common cause of adverse skin reactions.

Propylene glycol is implicated in contact dermatitis, kidney damage and liver abnormalities. It also damages cell membranes causing rashes, dry skin and surface damage.

Finding safe and natural products can often be confusing – the term “natural” is somewhat misleading with regard to use in cosmetics. In Australia manufacturers can add 5% of a natural ingredient to a synthetic product and call it natural.

Ultimately, what you use on your skin is an individual choice, and issues such as skincare goals, sensitivities or allergies, and personal values need to be taken into consideration. If you do choose to avoid ingredients such as those above the best way to do so is by reading product labels and making an informed decision. But if reading packages is not your style, it’s usually safe to say that organic ingredients are best – think Bond girl, but in the buff rather than bronzed.

Glowing skin, fewer wrinkles, no blemishes, fuller lips, and of course the benefits that come automatically from all this such as a hot guy at your side and the envying glances of every woman in the room. And amazingly, all easily achievable with the latest miracle cream! It’s easy to believe what the skincare giants promise, but do you know what you are actually slathering onto your skin?

Remember the scene in Goldfinger when the Bond girl is covered in gold paint and dies because her skin suffocates? While it is doubtful whether anyone would regularly practise anything so obviously wacky (not to mention expensive!) the outcome itself is not as crazy as it sounds. We tend to forget that the skin is the largest organ of the body,and every day we apply a chemical cocktail of substances in ignorant bliss, unaware that up to 60% of anything applied topically can be absorbed into our bodies. As the average woman uses up to 14 different skincare and cosmetic products each day, this calculates to a massive two kilograms of different chemicals each year seeping into our systems. So why does this matter? With many of the synthetic ingredients used in everyday skin care being potentially toxic to humans, you may like to reconsider some of the following:

Petrochemical derived ingredients (such as mineral oil) are extensively used in skin care as they help prevent water loss. While this may seem beneficial, they actually prevent the skin from breathing by forming an occlusive barrier, disrupting the skins normal functioning.

Parabens (a common preservative) have demonstrated oestrogen mimicking activity which disrupts the body’s normal hormonal balance. In addition, parabens have also been shown to cause abnormalities in cell reproduction, an issue also associated with cancerous cells.

Sodium Laurel Sulphate (SLS) (a foaming agent) used in toothpaste, shampoo and foaming cleansers. Numerous trials showed that SLS can increase transdermal water loss causing the skin to become dehydrated and cause skin irritation.

Phthalates are a group of synthetic chemicals that are used in the production of various substances such as plastics, beauty products and artificial fragrances. Phthalates can interfere with reproductive tissues in both men and women leading to issues such as infertility and birth defects. Specifically it targets the testes in men and breast tissue in women.

Parfum and synthetic fragrances are the most common cause of adverse skin reactions.

Propylene glycol is implicated in contact dermatitis, kidney damage and liver abnormalities. It also damages cell membranes causing rashes, dry skin and surface damage.

Finding safe and natural products can often be confusing – the term “natural” is somewhat misleading with regard to use in cosmetics. In Australia manufacturers can add 5% of a natural ingredient to a synthetic product and call it natural.

Ultimately, what you use on your skin is an individual choice, and issues such as skincare goals, sensitivities or allergies, and personal values need to be taken into consideration. If you do choose to avoid ingredients such as those above the best way to do so is by reading product labels and making an informed decision. But if reading packages is not your style, it’s usually safe to say that organic ingredients are best – think Bond girl, but in the buff rather than bronzed.

How to Neutralize Red Skin

If you suffer from blotchy skin, scarring, or Rosacea, you know how tough it is to make your face look fair and even. However, there are a few easy ways to neutralize red tones in your face and kick those woes to the curb. Make your way over to your local drug store or beauty supplier for a few essential tools needed to combat the redness blues. First, you’ll need to pick out a foundation that’s right for you.

Go for a light, whipped foundation that contains no oil and can be easily applied with a cosmetic sponge. Match the tone to the color of your neck and chest to ensure that you are picking the right shade, as red faces are more difficult to match. Pick out a stick or wand concealer in the same shade, as well as a compact powder. The secret ingredient to the perfect face, however, is a green neutralizing stick, which is sold by most beauty retailers. This stick resembles a tube of mint-green lipstick, and will help to cover up the worst redness in your face. Also pick up a green-tinted powder with a brush applicator.

Once you have arrived home, wash your face with a moisturizing cleanser and warm – not hot – water. Hot water can easily aggravate an already red face, so stick with a more tepid temperature. Use the green concealer stick to draw light marks over your reddest of spots – including the outside of the nostrils, the chin, and the cheeks. Blend in until it is no longer visible. Then, sweep the green powder lightly over your entire face to neutralize and set the tone. Use your natural concealer under your eyes, and apply the foundation with a cosmetic sponge over your entire face. Set it all with the compact powder, and apply the rest of your makeup as usual. Au revoir, redness!

Buy Revitol Natural Skin Care Line-Consumers Ask Where to Buy Revitol Product

Many consumers, men and women, want to know where to buy Revitol Skin care products. It seems thousands of people use the products like the Revitol cellulite cream or the Revitol acne system called Acnezine and get great results. They share with their friends the great results, but they must not share where they bought the product. Women go looking in all the big department stores,cosmetic stores, and beauty salons and they can not find the product anywhere.

The reason they can not find this skin care line is the company sells worldwide direct to consumers online. That is a very unusual marketing strategy but seems to be working for Revitol because they have sales in the millions and sell Revitol Product to consumers in countries all over the world. A product line in the competitive beauty industry has to be incredibly effective for so many millions to become loyal customers. They use all natural highest quality ingredients and researching the company I found out the strength of the company is the research and development team who formulates the products. The company invested in top R&D to develop unique high quality formulations instead of millions for marketing like most companies in the beauty industry.

The company was created in 2002 and is a member of the Natural Products Association. The company mission statement is “To deliver the highest quality health and beauty products with the best value to our customers.” They have a line of 8 products currently and sell directly to consumers online. They have free trial offers on the products so they seem to be confident about the results consumers will experience. They also have an offer to reward their loyal customers which is 2 free when you order a 4 pack. They have an unconditional 100% moneyback guarantee for 90 days if you are not satisfied. All the reviews I read were very positive on the Revitol product line. Many people buy revitol after reading the hundreds of glowing reviews online